By Crystal Chung @crystalkchung

THIS tiny spider looks ready to jump out from the screen in these incredible macro photographs

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Dinner is served: A Flathead Jumping Spider clutches onto a small fly that he prepares to devour

Shot in December 2015 by photographer Lee Hua Ming in his home in Kota Bharu, Malaysia, the images showcase every last detail of the hairy eight-legged creatures. 

The eye-popping pictures show the incredible hunting abilities of a jumping spider as they pounce for their meal.

Multi-use: Jumping spiders have some of the best vision and use it in courtship, hunting, and navigation

In one image a flathead jumper clutches onto a small fly that he prepares to devour whilst another picture shows a black garden jumper catching a green bottle fly.

Jumping spiders are generally recognised by their unique eye pattern as they have four pairs of eyes

Lee said: “Jumping spiders are really active so I decided to challenge myself and capture an image of them in action.

“I used a stacking technique, which involved taking around 30 images just for one perfect picture.

A close-up shot of Hyllus Semicupreus also known as 'semi-coppered heavy jumper' spider

“Some spiders are really good at posing as they sit quietly and eat their meal, so this was really helpful in allowing me to get the best detail in each image.

According to BBC Wildlife the jumping spider family contains over 500 described genera and over 5,000 described species making it the largest family of spiders.

Lee's incredible macro shots capture every last detail of the tiny insects including every hair on its body

Jumping spiders have some of the best vision and use it in courtship, hunting, and navigation. Although they normally move unobtrusively and fairly slowly, most species are capable of very agile jumps, notably when hunting, but sometimes in response to sudden threats or crossing long gaps.

Most species are capable of very agile jumps, notably when hunting

Jumping spiders are generally recognised by their unique eye pattern as they have four pairs of eyes with one pair being particularly large anterior median eyes.

Lee said: “Jumping spiders are really active so I decided to challenge myself and capture an image of them in action."

Jumping spiders range in size from a body length of 1 to 22 mm and they are widely found across the globe and can even be found up mount Everest. The jumping spiders are aptly named as they can spring more than 50 times their own body length to land on unsuspecting prey.

The jumping spider family contains over 500 described genera and over 5,000 described species making it the largest family of spiders

The 35-year-old snapper said: “I really wanted to take these photos to show that jumping spiders can be really cute and not all spiders are scary like people see them to be.

“What I love about the pictures are that they show how the jumping spider’s can be good hunters as they pounce for their meal.”