By Shannon Lane @shannonroselane

NOT only do these goosanders have to battle rough white water to catch their dinner, but they must also battle other ducks trying to steal their fish

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A Goosander is pictured catching a Lamprey and being chased in an attempt to be robbed of the fish

The goosander is a fresh water duck, known as a ‘sawbill’. This name is given from their long, serrated beak specially equipped for catching fish.

The goosander is a fresh water duck, known as a ‘sawbill’

British wildlife photographer David Tipling captured the chaotic scene along the River Nith, South West Scotland in December 2016.

British wildlife photographer David Tipling captured the chaotic scene along the River Nith

He said: “The goosanders gathered here to feed on lampreys that are migrating up stream to spawn like salmon do.

“When the lampreys get to the weir they are held up, so it is a good place for the birds to fish.”

David said: “On this occasion over 30 goosanders were fishing"

Despite being expert fishers, the more cunning goosanders chose to steal the other ducks’ fish rather than make the catch themselves.

David said: “On this occasion over 30 goosanders were fishing.

The Goosander get their name from their long, serrated beak specially equipped for catching fish

“A bird would emerge from its dive underwater with a fish, and the others would charge towards it to try and steal it off them.

The more cunning goosanders chose to steal the other ducks’ fish rather than catching their own

“It was spectacular to watch as often the fish would change hands a few times before one managed to swallow it while being chased.”

The birds gather to the River Nith to feed on the migrating lampreys

The ducks breed and eat on the fast flowing rivers of Britain’s uplands, making them strong, experienced swimmers in rough water.

The ducks breed and eat on the fast flowing rivers of Britain’s uplands

The photographer said: “Sometimes individuals would swim down the weir through the turbulent water reminding me of the Olympic slalom canoeists.”

See more of David's wildlife photography on www.davidtipling.com